Protest, Agitation and Parliamentary Reform in Britain, 1780 – 1928, Edexcel, 2015 SPEC

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Dear 12 Paine,

 

Please find my POGGLE above. It shows the work that you have handed in (or not as the case may be). If it is read that ,means I have marked it and returned the work to you. Please use this to keep a check on what you have done and need to keep up with.

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Dear Year 12 Paine (12 Paine is your new class name, as in the great Thomas Paine author of The Rights of Man),

Below is some work for you to get started with. This is your first set of tasks that I will set you. Please complete them.

I would also like to take this opportunity to remind/inform you of the principles of what you have to do. This is history. It is simple. Read, write notes, pose questions that you can create arguments both for and against, plan and write essays. This is your task. Mostly you DO NOT NEED A COMPUTER. Real learning happens when reading real books.

 

However, there are things both on this page and elsewhere on the internet that you can watch or listen to that will develop your understanding of the two topics we have to complete: The WOmen’s Social and Political Union 1903 – 1914 and Trade Union Militancy 1917 – 1927.

  1. Read p112 – 114.
  2. Complete notes under the following titles:
    1. Reasons for the growth of a movement calling for the Votes for Women.
    2. Tactics used by female suffrage campaigners from 1897 – 1903
  3. Read p144 – 121.
    1. Create a spider diagram on the WSPU, its leadership and organisation.
    2. List the reasons for the growth of militant tactics
    3. Create a spider diagram on the militant tactics of the WSPU from 1905 – 1914
    4. Create a spider diagram of the NON-militant tactics of the WSPU
    5. Notes on the Conciliation Committee. What was it? Why was it formed? What were the consequences of the Conciliation Committee?
  4. Complete the following essay and email it to me by Thursday 26/3/2020 at 12pm (noon): To what extent do you agree that a nationwide, grassroots movement was the key to the repeal of the CDAs in 1886?Agree:Popularity of Butler created a nationwide grassroots movementSupport from a broad and wide rangingbase of supportersThe work of the LNA – a ‘nation wide’ movement, creation of associations across the countryThis was the first time that a women’s movement gained momentum and was able to cause real change. The fact that women were excluded from the franchise meant that it was only through grassroots action that women could organise.1867 extension of the franchisemeantthat the grassroots movement had real power as the newly enfranchised middle and upper working class voters used their votes to support the campaign. E.g. by electing pro-repeal candidates. In the long term MPs had to respond to the extensions of the franchise by attempting to represent the will of the peopleLNA got publicity from the press creating a nationwide grassroots movementDisagree:It was the role of the press, as opposed to any nationwide, grassroots movement that was the key to the repeal of the CDAs.
    -Press spread the ideas of the repeal movement
    -In particular the press influenced MPs and the government

    It was the role of the nationwide, but not grassroots, non-conformist MPs that were key to the repeal of the CDAs.

    -This organised, professional and scientific based research campaigners proved that the CDAs were ineffective

    It was not a nationwide or grass roots movement but the action of a few individual MPs that were key to the repeal of the CDAs.

    It was the lack of understanding and commitment to the CDAs in parliament that were key to their repeal

    Newforms of scientific campaigningwas the key to the repeal of the CDAs.

    Lobbyingof Liberal MPs was the key to the repeal of the CDAs.

    THefact that the Liberals were able to reform a government was the key to the repeal of the CDAs.

    Thefact that compulsory examinations rendered the CDAs ineffective and this lead to the repeal of the CDAs.

    Publicitywas the key to the repeal of the CDAs.

    Themovement was clearlynot nationwideas the non-conformists were a religious minority.

Monday 30th March:

Dear 12 Paine,

Thank you for your essays. I shall be marking them this week and returning them to you. Please complete the following:

  1. Read p121 – 126 and write notes on:
    1. Causes of the rise of militancy
    2. Describe the militancy of the WSPU
    3. Describe the response to militancy by the Liberal government
    4. The consequences of the militancy of the WSPU.
  2. Make a fact file for the following members of the WSPU and their roles in it:
    1. Emily Davison
    2. Christabel Pankhurst
    3. Emmeline Pankhurst
    4. Sylvia Pankhurst.
  3. Using the text book and your own research, make a table on the attempts to pass legislation for female suffrage (remember Wikipedia is an excellent source): Give:
    1. Reasons for the bill’s introduction
    2. Describe the bill
    3. Reasons for the failure of the bill
    4. Consequences of the failure of the billYou will need to do this for the following legislative attempts:
      1. Women’s Suffrage bill 1909
      2. Conciliation Committee and the Conciliation bills 1910 and 1911
      3. Government franchise bill 1913

Your Easter Holiday homework is:

  1. Read p127 – 129
  2. Give both sides of the argument: To what extent had the WSPU been successful in their aims by 1914?
  3. Give both sides of the argument: ‘The militancy of the WSPU benefited the cause of women’s suffrage.’
  4. Using the source on P131 complete the Source based question. This is due in on Monday 20th April at 12pm.

21/4/20

Greetings 12 Paine,

Firstly, I hope that you are and all of your loved ones are ok. I hope that you got to have a bit of Lockdown Fun over the Easter Holidays.

I know that lots of you have sent me your Easter holiday homework, so thank you. I will check and mark it for you during the course of this week.

This week we are going to consolidate our knowledge of the WSPU whilst starting to move onto Trade Union Militancy.

You need to:

  1. Plan essay  No1 on p131 in your text book. You will need to write out:

A full introduction

Full POINT sentences.

Bullet points of evidence

Full explanation sentences – This meant that… and Therefore… (using LT/ST, SPERM/extents/ judgemental language).

A full conclusion

2. Read and write notes on p132 – 136.

Thanks and well done.

Edward

 

Monday 27/4/2020:

Dear 12 Paine,

Please complete the lesson below:

L46 The Causes of the General Strike

Email to Mr Lloyd on 4/5/2020

4/5/2020:

Dear 12 Paine,

Please complete this lesson:

L47 – General Strike and its end

Email to Mr Lloyd on 11/5/2020

11/5/2020:

Dear Paine,

Please complete this lesson:

L48 – The consequences of the General Strike
Due on the 18/5/202 – ‘The General Strike was a caused by the actions of the British Government.’ TWE would you agree?

Email to Mr Lloyd on 18/5/2020

18/5/2020:

Dear Paine,

Please complete the lesson below:

L49 Parliament Act 1911 and Reform Act1918

Email to Mr Lloyd on 1/6/2020

 

1/6/2020:

We are completeing a review of the two Breadth Topics. First we will look for the next two weeks at ‘Reform of Parliament’ from 1780 – 1928.

Analyse the source on p114 using the question on p149 of our text book Baumann. We will discuss this in our discussion tomorrow from 11am- 12pm.

Read p10 – 24 in Rees and take notes on the Reform of Parliament. It looks like this looks like this:

Edexcel A Level History, Paper 3: Protest, agitation and parliamentary reform c1780-1928 Student Book + ActiveBook by Peter Callaghan

8/6/2020:

This week we will be completing our review of the Breadth Topic ‘Reform of Parliament’.

Please complete the chapter from Rees, reading p24 – 33 and taking notes.

 

You are also going to complete the essay below. We planned it in groups before Lockdown started. Below is the indicative content and the plan that three of you made in class:

2018 – Question 7 How accurate is it to say that changes to the system of representation, in the years 1815–1928, were mainly driven by government fear of revolution?

Indicative content :

Candidates are expected to reach a judgement about whether changes to the system of representation, in the years 1815–1928, were mainly driven by government fear of revolution.

Arguments and evidence supporting the statement that changes to the system of representation, in the years 1815–1928, were mainly driven by government fear of revolution should be analysed and evaluated. Relevant points may include:

  • The development of pressure groups that combined different interests and threatened the possibility of direct action and possibly revolution, e.g. 1830 the Birmingham Political Union, 1864–65 the Reform Union and Reform League
  • The impact of riots in, e.g. Nottingham, Bristol and London, in creating fear of revolution and driving forward the changes to the system in the 1832 Representation of the People Act
  • The impact of the Hyde Park riots in encouraging the government to seriously consider changes to the system of representation in 1867
  • The impact of revolution abroad, e.g. in France 1830, in affecting the decision by governments to implement changes to the system of representation.

Arguments and evidence supporting the statement that changes to the system of representation, in the years 1815–1928, were not mainly driven by government fear of revolution and/or were mainly driven by other factors should be analysed and evaluated. Relevant points may include:

  • Despite fear of revolution in the years 1815–1819 and in the Chartist years, there were no changes made to the system of representation as a result of this fear
  • Divisions in the Tory party in 1830 enabled the Whigs to take office and they were amenable to the implementation of changes to the representative system
  • The impact of war, e.g. the First World War, in affecting the decision by governments to implement changes to the system of representation
  • The role played by the search for political advantage by leading politicians in driving changes to the system, e.g. the rivalry between Gladstone and Disraeli in 1867, Salisbury and the redistribution of seats in 1885
  • Some changes were the logical extension of previous changes, e.g. 1884 extended 1867 for men and 1928 extended 1918 for women.

 

Your plan:

Fear of Revolution caused change:

1815 – Fear of Revolutin was great after the ec downturn after thewar. 1830 Second French Revolution.

1832 – Days of May, Bishop of Bristol, GO for gold, intervention of Rothschild, reform to conserve, culture of non-conformist reform,

1867 – riots in Hyde Park encouraged pushing through of act, long term impact of Chartism, 1860 – 63 American Revolution

1872 – 1885

1918 – fear of Bolsehvik rising, rising power of the TUs

1928

Other factors caused change:

1832 – Whigs, actions of William 4th,

1867 – Whig-Tory, Disreali, Derby rivalry, desire to curry favour with th enew electorate

1872 Secret Ballot and corrupt practices Axct 1883– end corruption, reduce costs

1885 redistribution of the seats =- tories wanted to gain consitutnenciey sbenefits

1918 – sense of debt to the w/c for fighting in WW1

1928 – greater equality for women.

 

10/6/2020

Watch the ppt. below:

WSPU Pre-recorded Lesson FINAL

 

15/6/20

  1. Email me the essay that was set on the 8/6/20 (see above)
  2. Read Rees Chapter 3.2 pages 36 – 45 and write notes on the ‘How far did the influence of the crown and aristocracy over elections and parliament change in the years 1780 – 1928?’
  3. Watch the pre-recorded lecture on the Reform of Parliament that I will post on Tuesday or Wednesday.
  4. Attend the MSTeams Discussion every Monday from 10:30 – 12:30

 

22/6/2020

  1. Read Rees, Chapter 3.2 p46 – 62 and write notes on ‘To what extent did political parties change in the years 1780 – 1928?’
  2. Watch the pre-recorded lecture on the changing influence of the crown and aristocracy from 1780 – 1928.
  3. Attend the MSTeams Discussion every Monday from 10:30 – 12:30

 

29/6/2020

  1. Write the essay, ‘The influence of the aristocracy in parliament substantially declined in the years 1780 – 1911. How far do you agree?’ This is due on 6/7/2020 at 10:30am.
  2. Watch the pre-recorded lecture on the changing shape and role played by political parties that I will post on Tuesday or Wednesday.
  3. Attend the MSTeams Discussion every Monday from 10:30 – 12:30

 

6/7/2020

  1. We start the American Dream

 

Writing essays:

how to write and essay

rough grade boundaries for a-level history

All questions doc Protest

All answers DocSource

Exemplar – Chartists Kennington Common

Source Exemplar – TU militancy

 

 

Lessons:

Lesson 30 – Breadth 1 -Triumph of democracy

Lesson 36 – Breadth 2 – Whig Liberal Timeline

Lesson 35 – Breadth 2 – Peel and New Conservatism

Lesson 34 – Breadth 2 -Tory Conservative Timeline

Lesson 33 – Breadth 1 – Review question on franchise

Lesson 32 – Breadth 1- 1867-1885 reform acts – double lesson

Lesson 31 – Breadth 1- Disraeli and 1867 Act

Reform of Parliament – Breadth Study 1:

Breadth 1 Discussion

Radical Reformers – Depth Study 1:

Peterloo:

 

Luddites:

 

Chartists Video TImelines TV:

 

Urban Slums Video, TImelines TV:

Factories and Machines, Timelines TV Video:

 

Railway boom in the 1830s – 1850s: – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_rail_transport_in_Great_Britain_1830%E2%80%931922

Poor Laws Podcast:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m0001m73

Corn Laws Podcast:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b03dvbyk

Industrial Revolution Podcast:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00wr9r7

The Great Reform Act Podcast:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00flwh9

Legacy of the French Revolution:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p00547gg

Peterloo Massacre:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p003k9l7

 

Votes for Women

 

Depth Topic 5: Trade Union Militancy 1917 – 1927

The specification states that we need to know:

  • The roles of Manny Shinwell, James Maxton, Ernest Bevin
    and J H Thomas; the events and significance of the Glasgow
    rent strike, 1915, and the 40-hour strike, 1919.
  •  Union revival after the First World War: the Triple Alliance;
    the impact of Black Friday, 1921; the importance of the
    Council of Action and the formation of the AEU and TGWU.
  • The General Strike, 1926: reasons for its occurrence and
    failure; roles of media, government and TUC; reasons for
    its failure. The Trades Disputes Act 1927.

 

Podcast – Michael Portillo examines how Trade Union Militancy was rising prior to WW1:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/sounds/play/p01b455g
History of trade unions in the United Kingdom – Wikipedia:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_trade_unions_in_the_United_Kingdom